Monthly Archives: March 2009

Beyonce and School Redesign

I know this sounds really unexpected and a bit bizarre but here goes . . . Part 1. It’s hard to imagine being under 85 years old and not having come across some reference to the Beyoncé music video “Single … Continue reading

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Tapscott and thoughts for the New Year

In Grown Up Digital, Tapscott notes: “Net Geners possess a tool of unprecedented power and are driving changes that could topple many established orders . . .People no longer have to follow the leaders and do what they’re told. Now … Continue reading

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WWGD # 1

My latest “read” has been What Would Google Do? by Jeff Jarvis. I had picked up the hardcover when strolling through the Orlando airport when I was stuck there on a 36 hour flight delay a couple of weeks ago. … Continue reading

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Middlemen and WL Instruction

One of the ideas in WWGD is that the days of the middle man are drawing to a rapid close. So many examples no need to even bother providing any. What no one has pointed out is that teachers are … Continue reading

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Claiming the 21st Century for Learners and Learning

While reading a blog today on Classroom20.com I came across an entry that wondered why education is so behind in adopting technology. Here was my reply: We’re behind because we can be! I hate to say it, but think about … Continue reading

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The IBM Selectric as a School Model

During a recent evening of channel surfing, I stumbled across a great show on the History Channel dealing with the development of the typewriter. I knew some about the history of the typewriter, including the fact that they key placement … Continue reading

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